What is recovery?

A person is in recovery when that person says so. Progress in recovery requires a personal commitment to, and action toward, reducing and repairing the harm addictive behaviors have caused to mind, body, and spirit. 

Maintaining a commitment to recovery and following through with the tasks of recovery are often overwhelming without the support of others who have experience with the recovery process.


What is recovery coaching?

Recovery coaching is a person-centered, strengths-based approach for supporting people who suffer from their own or someone else's addictions. Recovery coaches are allies and mentors who view a person as being in recovery when that person begins to consider making life changes and evaluating harmful effects of alcohol and drug use, codependency, or other addictive behaviors. Recovery centers provide recovery coaching at no cost to participants.


What recovery coaches do

  • Ask powerful questions and help people in recovery make decisions about how to improve their lives.
  • Support people on all paths to recovery.
  • Help people find ways to stop addictive behaviors (abstinence) or reduce harm associated with addictive behaviors.
  • Help people find resources that help them make progress in recovery.
  • Acknowledge traumatic pasts and help people move forward or seek clinical support.
  • Help people achieve life goals disrupted by addiction.
  • Support positive change, help people avoid relapse, build recovery capital, and connect with a recovery community.
  • Help people explore their feelings, provide encouragement, and celebrate successes.
  • Guide people through the recovery coaching process, an action-oriented approach that emphasizes improving someone's present life.

How a recovery coach helps

A recovery coach will help you create a vision for your recovery, define your goals, and work toward those goals. A coach will ask questions and listen. You lead the way on this journey; you decide what your recovery will look like. A coach will support your choices and help you make your goal a reality.

The coach helps you develop and achieve your own personal goals for a life in recovery. This planning process helps clarify your vision for a better life and take action.

Together, you and your coach will explore what steps and services will help you succeed in your recovery.

Questions coaches ask:

  • What do you want in life?
  • What gets in the way?
  • What can we do to solve that problem?

If you or someone you know is interested in recovery coaching,
contact Kenneth Sigsbury at director.tpc@comcast.net or
call (802) 442~9700 for more information. 

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